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The “multiple facets” of Arab women: Taking the dive

January 24, 2016 6:09 pm

Brands are increasingly reaching out to a wide and proactive female audience in the region.

Brands in the Middle East are constantly trying to reach out to their target audience and potential consumers, especially the female customer base, with which the power of spending usually lies in almost every household.

In the past few years, the region has witnessed an increasing rise in female-focused brand initiatives, campaigns and other forms of communication. Some of these have even gone beyond direct product communication and have focused on emphasising the power of women in society.

However, the power of the Arab woman and the means of reaching out to her in the different roles she plays at home and in society are not yet fully broken down, detailed or understood, although there has been noticeable progress.

“As a professional marketer – and as a woman – I can see that women in the Arab world are changing fast. They are developing multiple ‘facets’, juggling many roles: being the CEO and the Chief Purchasing Officer at home, the CEO of their business, as well as the traditional role of motherhood,” Christina Ioannidis, chair of Marketing To Women Conference, tells AMEinfo.

Marketing To Women Conference has grown to become go-to destination for the region’s marketers and brands, through which they can tackle challenge, new trends and potential solutions for engaging with Arab women across the board.

The conference returns this year for its second edition, which will be held in Dubai on February 8, exactly one month before the world celebrates International Women’s Day on March 8.

Rather than being just another conference about women, Marketing To Women actually lays on the table realistic, everyday challenges that could be hindering brand’s efforts in reaching the full potential of their communication efforts.

“[Women] have more disposable income and are ripe [for] spending it,” Ioannidis said. “Even in the traditional KSA market, women are turning to new social platforms to fulfil their dreams and be more economically active,” she adds.

This year’s conference sessions will tackle various aspects of brands’ quests to reach out to their female audience, with a special focus on the behaviours of the modern woman.

We will investigate how women and men differ on their online behaviour, how retailers are utilising technology to not [only] amplify their communications but also improve their in-shop purchasing,” Ioannidis explains. “In my opinion, marketers have to catch up with the social shift in the role of women in the Arab world.”

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AMEinfo Staff
By AMEinfo Staff
AMEinfo staff members report business news and views from across the Middle East and North Africa region, and analyse global events impacting the region today.

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