Hotels reinventing themselves to reach new travellers

September 19, 2016 10:12 am

Turquoise waters and sandy beaches on the West coast of Aruba. (Image: Alamy)

The rise of a new travellers’ category has taken the hospitality industry by storm.

This new generation of young travellers is changing some of the core perceptions for players in the sector, leading to the birth of new hospitality concepts, such as destinations dedicated to hosting music shows and performances, like Nikki Beach in Dubai, or others with attractive adventurous offerings, such as W Dubai in Al Habtoor City – specialty hotels aimed at attracting today’s traveller.

Through such specialty offerings, hotels and resorts are focused on attracting specific audience segments, with clear characteristics and behaviours, rather than attracting the masses.

Alexander Schneider, general manager at Nikki Beach Hotels & Resorts in Europe, Middle East and Africa regions, spoke about this shift in direction during his participation in the Vision Conference, set up on the sidelines of The Hotel Show, which is taking place in Dubai this week.

He said his team has followed a specific strategy to attract millennials and has focused on a specific segment of these, especially those interested in a Western design ambience.

“The new generation enters the market searching for experiences, not just regular hospitality. As the demographics change and [due to] the existence of a middle class that is able to travel the world, we need to discover these audiences as hotels, we need to learn from them to understand what they look for when they travel,” said Peter Katusak-Husvar, general manager for the W Dubai Al Habtoor City.

According to Peter, the new world travellers share the following characteristics: “They care about social media, technology, actual applicable experiences and they want to get what they desire instantly, so we need to anticipate their wants and needs ahead of time to be able to offer it when asked.”

But finding out what this new traveller wants is not an easy task.

“You can reach out to the youth and actually get to them only if you do your job right; if you are able to offer an exciting story, a global brand and target segments interested in exploring. But having said all of that, communication tools have changed and the definition of an experience has changed as well. This [scenario] puts the new brands at the forefront here, because they have something new to offer, unlike the older, more traditional brands, where the guests know what service to expect,” Schneider said.

This article first appeared on Saneou Al Hadath, a sister title of AMEinfo.

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AMEinfo Staff
By AMEinfo Staff
AMEinfo staff members report business news and views from across the Middle East and North Africa region, and analyse global events impacting the region today.



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