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Saudi women are taking over men’s jobs! Will they be successful?

January 5, 2018 2:29 pm


If you ever order a cab in Saudi Arabia, you will never find a woman behind the wheel. Never say never.

Soon, Saudi women taxi drivers will be behind the wheel in more ways than one: driving themselves to work or driving you to your destination.

Emboldened and encouraged by Saudi Vision 2030, many Saudi women are expected to occupy jobs that had been exclusive to men, and are typically more excited.

According to the Saudi Gazette, the number of women seeking jobs during Q3 2017 reached 1,040,727 compared to 190,822 men only.

Do Saudi women have a diversity of work options?

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Who said women can’t be technical?

Saudi women will soon be able to join the Saudi Ground Services Co. as clerks at check-in counters starting February, according to Arab News, Arab news website.

They will undergo technical training courses such as passenger services, check-in procedures, safety, security, and soft skills courses such as communication skills, customer services skills and time management, according to the report.

The company received 10,000 applications through the online career portal.

Women drivers? This could be exciting!

Ride hailing app Careem has said it would look to hire women drivers in Saudi Arabia when the ban on female drivers is lifted in June 2018.

It said it had already established a female-only call centre to create new jobs for Saudi women.

Meanwhile, the kingdom’s Princess Nourah bint Andulrahman University tweeted that it was planning to open an all-female driving training school in partnership with relevant authorities.

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A woman can sell more!

According to Saudi Gazette, the Saudi Ministry of Labor and Social Development went ahead with plans to introduce Saudi women sales personnel at shops selling women’s accessories at indoor malls, outdoor shopping centers and independent stores starting Oct. 21, 2017.

According to figures by the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, the number of Saudi women working in the private sector has increased by 130 percent in the past four years.

Financial Times also reveals that the one area where women have made inroads is in the retail sector, where more than 200,000 Saudi women have jobs.

New mining ambitions

The Maaden Mining Co. announced in December 2017 a partnership agreement to establish a new women’s training program to develop the mining skills of Saudi women.

Vice president of the gold sector at the Saudi Arabian Mining Co., Yahya Al-Shangiti, was quoted in the media as saying that they are now working on a women’s jewelry training program to train them in goldsmith skills in Madinah.

Al-Shangiti said: “The work in the mines is very hard. Where we work underground is 400 meters deep, and globally the number of women in this field is limited.”

He added: “It is possible for women to occupy administrative positions in mining rather than working as a miner in the future.”

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Saudi women already making giant leaps in business

Saudi women have already been given more responsibility as high level appointees in major governmental posts.

The Mayor of Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province, Fahd Bin Mohammed Al-Jubair, appointed a woman as Assistant Mayor of Al-Khobar Municipality on September 25, in order to support the rapid growth of malls and supermarkets in which women are working.

NCB Capital Co-Chief Executive Officer Sarah Al Suhaimi became the first woman to chair Saudi Arabia’s stock exchange, the largest stock market in the Middle East.

Rania Nashar was named Chief Executive of Samba Financial Group becoming the first female CEO of a listed Saudi commercial bank and Latifa Al-Sabhan was appointed Chief Financial Officer of Arab National Bank (ANB).

Saudi women have particularly made huge strides in the field of entrepreneurship as well.

 

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By Dana Halawi
Senior Journalist
Dana Halawi has over seven years of experience in Journalism with articles published in multiple magazines and a newspaper in Lebanon. She specialized in Banking and Finance at the Lebanese American University and has a Master’s degree in International Affairs.



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